Trevor Silbert
November 30, 2018
Staff Reporter


Pipe bombs. Racial outbursts. War. Midterms. Shootings. White House press conferences. Wildfires, both literal and metaphorical. Migrant children gagging on tear gas. The frenzied world portrayed in the news is hard to keep up with and hard to cope with. So here are the official Raider Review pro tips and a three-step process on how to deal with the raging outside world.

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  1. Say that you see the head-grabbing headline that scientists were wrong about how fast the oceans were warming. You deserve a 45-minute nap and a warm cup of tea. 88 people dead in California wildfires? A hike in the woods and a thirty-minute break. Did you just hear about the GM layoffs and Trump’s outbursts at the Federal Reserve? Look at cute cat videos. Try looking at some uplifting, positive news here. Looking for satire? Try looking at tweets on Melania’s Christmas trees.

and if all else fails…

  1. Stop watching the news so much. Refrain from reading the news for a day. Trade in the hard news for Buzzfeed and you’ll see the difference. If you must read the news, switch out CNN or Fox News for the Washington Post or NPR for less abject horror and more factual stories.
  1. Take the news with a grain of salt. Consider whether the topic you’re stressing about directly affects you. Does the US trade deficit make you cry at night? Probably not. If it doesn’t affect you personally, then why are you worrying about it so much?

Whether you’re pulling your hair out over politics, recounting your most recent victory on a test, or you’ve runoff into the wilderness and pretended that politics doesn’t exist, a little bit of rest and relaxation coupled with reading the news in moderation can stop your worrying.

Posted by Trevor Silbert

Trevor Silbert, a sophomore and second-year student journalist in Columbia, MD, is excited to be a part of The Raider Review community this year and is especially looking forward to learning about and sharing the thoughts of those in the Atholton community. In Trevor’s free time, he enjoys vacationing, designing websites, and reading speculative fiction and sci-fi books. His favorite book is Welcome to Night Vale by Cranor and Fink. Trevor went on a youth group trip to San Francisco this past summer, helping at a soup kitchen and a thrift store. When Trevor isn’t reading or hiking, he enjoys playing with his wheaten terrier-poodle mix named Libby.